Media Coverage

News4JaX | Mar 2021

UF cancer drug receives FDA clearance for clinical trials

An anticancer drug developed by researchers from the University of Florida College of Pharmacy has become the first drug of its kind allowed to proceed to clinical trial by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The drug, DT2216, targets leukemia, lymphoma, and breast and lung cancers. The researchers expect it will available for patients, in a clinical trial setting, in April or May this year.

UF Health cancer center | feb 2021

UF researchers developing new cancer immunotherapy drug

University of Florida Health Cancer Center researchers have found a potential new way of targeting this population of immune-suppressive T cells that could possibly benefit a large population of cancer patients, including those who will not respond to other immunotherapies. The researchers discovered that B-cell lymphoma extra-large, or BCL-XL, is a potential molecular target of TI-Tregs, which play an important role within tumors to promote an immunosuppressive microenvironment and inhibit anti-cancer immunity.

Fight aging | may 2020

Turning Navitoclax into a PROTAC Senolytic with a Better Safety Profile

It is interesting to compare today’s open access paper on converting the senolytic drug navitoclax into a PROTAC with recent efforts to improve navitoclax by conjugation with galactose. In both cases the objective is to reduce side-effects, but the strategies are quite different.

Life Extension Advocacy foundation | apr 2020

Refining Senolytic Drugs to Be Less Toxic and More Effective

Researchers have developed a way to modify an existing cancer drug with toxic side effects into something that is less toxic to blood platelets and more effective at removing harmful and inflammatory senescent cells, one of the reasons we age, from mice.

PR newswire | Feb 2020

Dialectic Therapeutics Receives $3 Million Seed Award for Product Development Research from the Cancer Prevention & Research Institute of Texas

Dialectic will use the funding from the CPRIT Seed Award to further the development of its lead product candidate, DT2216, a unique compound built using its proprietary and novel Antiapoptotic Protein Targeted Degradation (APTaD™) technology. In pre-clinical studies, DT2216 selectively induces cancer cells to degrade B-cell lymphoma extra large, or BCL-XL, stimulating the cells to commit suicide or become more susceptible to chemotherapy.

Dallas Innovates | Feb 2020

Dialectic Therapeutics Plans to Further Cancer Drug Research Using $3M Seed Award

Dallas biotech startup Dialectic Therapeutics Inc. has announced plans to use a $3 million Seed Award for Product Development Research from the Cancer Prevention & Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) to further develop its lead product candidate, an anti-cancer drug.

AACR Cancer Discovery | Feb 2020

The PROTAC DT2216 Targets Cancer by Promoting BCL-XL Degradation

Researchers have developed a novel drug targeting the elusive BCL-XL with improved efficacy and reduced toxicity compared to its predecessor, although further work would be needed to optimize the dose. Further, this work demonstrates how PROTACs that bind tissue-specific E3 ligases can be used to target the drugs to the desired sites, limiting their toxicity in other tissues.

Biocentury | jan 2020

Targeted Bcl-XL degrader identified to treat ALL, TNBC and SCLC

A University of Florida team led by Dialectic Therapeutics Inc. co-founders Guangrong Zheng and Daohong Zhou developed a Bcl-XL degrader effective against acute lymphoblastic leukemia, triple negative breast cancer, and small cell lung cancer.

The independent florida alligator | jan 2020

UF researchers develop potential drug that could treat various cancers

Researchers from the UF College of Pharmacy say they have found a potential drug to treat some types of leukemia, lymphoma and breast and lung cancers. The results were published in Nature Medicine last month.
The potential drug is a compound called DT2216 and acts on a protein that increases cancerous cells and resists treatment.

the business report of north central florida | dec 2019

UF researchers discover breakthrough anticancer drug

Researchers from the University of Florida College of Pharmacy have discovered a safer and more effective anticancer drug to target leukemia, lymphoma, and breast and lung cancers. The journal Nature Medicine published the findings this month.

cbs4 news gainesville | dec 2019

UF researchers discover breakthrough anticancer drug

Inside their lab at the UF College of Pharmacy researchers Dr. Guangrong Zheng and Dr. Daohong Zhou are working on a drug that could be a safer and more effective way to fight leukemia, lymphoma and breast cancer. The drug targets a protein which fuels the growth of cancer cells.

trialsite news | dec 2019

University of Florida Researchers Discover New Breakthrough Anticancer Drug

University of Florida College of Pharmacy researchers disclosed that they have discovered a safer and more effective anticancer drug. The new treatment would target leukemia, lymphoma, and breast and lung cancers. Known as DT2216, it affects a protein (called B-cell lymphoma extra-large), which grows malignant cells and strengthens their resistance to treatment.

Creative loafing tampa bay | Dec 2019

University of Florida announces new breakthrough cancer drug

Researchers from the University of Florida College of Pharmacy say they have discovered a safer and more effective anticancer drug. The new treatment would target leukemia, lymphoma, and breast and lung cancers.
The drug, known currently as DT2216, affects a protein (called B-cell lymphoma-extra large), which grows malignant cells and strengthens their resistance to treatment.

Fox35 orlando | dec 2019

Breakthrough anti-cancer drug discovered by UF researchers

Researchers at the University of Florida College of Pharmacy believe they have stumbled upon a drug that will target different types of cancer safely and more effectively.
The findings, published in the journal Nature Medicine, states that the new drug will target leukemia, lymphoma, and breast and lung cancers.

Orlando weekly | dec 2019

University of Florida College of Pharmacy reveals breakthrough cancer drug

Researchers from the University of Florida College of Pharmacy say they have discovered a safer and more effective anticancer drug. The new treatment would target leukemia, lymphoma, and breast and lung cancers.
The drug, known currently as DT2216, affects a protein (called B-cell lymphoma-extra large), which grows malignant cells and strengthens their resistance to treatment.

UF HEALTH NEWS | DEC 2019

UF researchers discover breakthrough anticancer drug

Researchers from the University of Florida College of Pharmacy have discovered a safer and more effective anticancer drug to target leukemia, lymphoma, and breast and lung cancers. The journal Nature Medicine published the findings this month

Medical express | dec 2019

Leukemia, lymphoma squarely in sights of new class of drugs

UT Health San Antonio researchers, working with collaborators at the University of Florida, have discovered a safe and potent next generation of drugs to fight multiple types of leukemia and lymphoma in adults and children. The journal Nature Medicine reported the findings Dec. 2.

world pharma news

Leukemia, lymphoma squarely in sights of new class of drugs

“PROTAC drugs degrade the BCL-XL protein rather than merely inhibiting it,” said Peter Houghton, Ph.D., professor of molecular medicine and director of the Greehey Institute. “Potentially this class of drug can be developed against certain childhood cancers that have been untreatable.”

UF College of pharmacy news | aug 2019

Evading age: Drs. Daohong Zhou and Guangrong Zheng receive $2.5 million NIH grant to study selective elimination of senescent cells

The scientific team of Daohong Zhou, Ph.D., a professor of pharmacodynamics, and Guangrong Zheng, Ph.D., an associate professor of medicinal chemistry, have received a five-year, $2.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, or NIH, to study selective elimination of senescent cells. Their research has the potential to extend human lifespan by preventing and treating age-related diseases.

fight aging | may 2018

Uncovering the Senolytic Mechanism of Piperlongumine

Piperlongumine (PL) is one of a few natural products identified to have the ability to selectively kill SCs. Compared to other known senolytic agents, PL has the advantage of low toxicity, an excellent PK/PD profile, and oral bioavailability. However, its molecular targets and mechanisms of action are unknown. To facilitate the development of PL and its analogues as senolytic drug candidates, it is critical to identify PL molecular targets, which can form a molecular basis for the rational design of new PL analogues.

fight aging | dec 2016

Piperlongumine as a Senolytic Drug Candidate with Fewer Side-Effects

Recently, we discovered ABT-263, a potent and highly selective senolytic agent, by screening a library of rationally-selected compounds. With this screening approach, we also identified a second senolytic agent called piperlongumine (PL). PL is a natural product that is reported to have many pharmacological effects, including anti-tumor activity.